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Friday, October 31, 2014

Exposing a Disgrace: Uzbek Elite Keep Profiting from Forced Labor | Open Society Foundations (OSF)


Every year, the government of Uzbekistan forcibly mobilizes more than a million of its own citizens to pick cotton. Under international pressure, the authorities in Tashkent have recently moved away from forcing young children to pick cotton. But the system still depends on exporting cotton picked by adults who are essentially government slaves. 

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Exposing a Disgrace: Uzbek Elite Keep Profiting from Forced Labor | Open Society Foundations (OSF):


Saturday, October 25, 2014

BBC News - 'Modern day slavery' farmer David Doran jailed for four years

A horse farmer who forced a "terrified" vulnerable man to work unpaid for 13 years in "modern day slavery" has been jailed for four-and-a-half years.
David Daniel Doran, 42, pleaded guilty midway through his trial to making Darrell Simester, from Worcestershire, perform forced or compulsory labour.
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BBC News - 'Modern day slavery' farmer David Doran jailed for four years:



Friday, October 24, 2014

New data offers an inside look at labor trafficking in the U.S. - The Washington Post

Many foreign-born victims of labor trafficking actually came to the United States legally, according to a study released Tuesday that provides an in-depth look into forced labor.
The study from Urban Institute and Northeastern University draws upon a trove of data, including closed records of 122 victims, as well as interviews with people who had been forced into work, along with police and advocates.
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New data offers an inside look at labor trafficking in the U.S. - The Washington Post:

Special Report: Traffickers use abductions, prison ships to feed Asian slave trade | Reuters


"Testimonies from Bangladeshi and Rohingya survivors provide evidence of a shift in tactics in one of Asia’s busiest human-trafficking routes. In the past, evidence showed most people boarded smuggling boats voluntarily. Now people are being abducted or tricked and then taken to larger ships anchored in international waters just outside Bangladesh’s maritime boundary."

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Special Report: Traffickers use abductions, prison ships to feed Asian slave trade | Reuters:

JAMA Network | JAMA Pediatrics | Integrating Curricula on Human Trafficking Into Medical Education and Residency Training

JAMA Network | JAMA Pediatrics | Integrating Curricula on Human Trafficking Into Medical Education and Residency Training:

By Aimee M. Grace, MD, MPH; Roy Ahn, MHP, ScD; Wendy Macias Konstantopoulos, MD, MPH

Health care professionals are more likely than other professionals to interact with trafficking victims while they are enslaved. The authors call for "medical schools, residency programs, health professional organizations and societies, and national regulatory bodies to ensure the human trafficking education becomes part of medical school instruction and residency training." This, as well as encouraging research are examples of ways in which health care professionals can respond to human trafficking.

Full article may be available from Dr. Grace (agrace@stanfordalumi.org).


Tuesday, October 21, 2014

LexisNexis and STOP THE TRAFFIK launch a new report looking at human trafficking within the cotton industry | LexisNexis Business Information Solutions


LONDON, 01 OCTOBER 2014 – LexisNexis® Legal & Professional (www.lexisnexis.com), a leading global provider of content and technology solutions, and STOP THE TRAFFIK a leading Non-Governmental Organisation dedicated to the eradication of human trafficking, announce the publication of their joint report titled ‘Dressed to Kill’.
Dressed to KillForced labour is unfortunately a very big part of human trafficking. To raise awareness for both consumers and organisations, this report by LexisNexis® and STOP THE TRAFFIK is designed to help the cotton industry – as well as the broader public - understand what is happening today and offers guidance on how to take actions to eliminate or reduce the risk.

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LexisNexis and STOP THE TRAFFIK launch a new report looking at human trafficking within the cotton industry | LexisNexis Business Information Solutions:



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