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Friday, September 26, 2014

Debate: Prevention and Victim Compensation | Human Rights Watch

Author(s): 
 Nisha Varia
Afroza, a Bangladeshi woman who worked for sixteen years without getting paid and was not allowed to go home to visit her family. Keni, an Indonesian woman whose employers injured her with a hot iron, leaving disfiguring third-degree burns all over her body. Kartika, an older Sri Lankan woman whose employers made her work around the clock without pay, shaved her head to humiliate her and gouged pieces of flesh out of her arm with knives. 
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Thursday, September 25, 2014

Of millions spent to fight trafficking, victims get little | Reuters

A recent issue of Anti-Trafficking Review, an annual journal by the Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW), challenges  the effectiveness and efficiency of funds spent on anti-trafficking by the UN, governments and private groups. 

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Of millions spent to fight trafficking, victims get little | Reuters:

Related articles

Child Trafficking Rampant in Underdeveloped Indian Villages | Inter Press Service

Child Trafficking Rampant in Underdeveloped Indian Villages | Inter Press Service:


THIRUVANANTHAPURAM, India , Sep 4 2014 (IPS- In a country where well over half the population lives on less than two dollars a day, it takes a lot to shock people. The sight of desperate families traveling in search of money and food, whole communities defecating in the open, old women performing back-breaking labour, all this is simply part of life in India, home to 1.2 billion people.
But amidst this rampant destitution, some things still raise red flags, or summon collective cries of fury. Child trafficking is one such issue, and it is earning front-page headlines in states where thousands of children are believed to be victims of the illicit trade.

Read more:
http://www.ipsnews.net/2014/09/child-trafficking-rampant-in-underdeveloped-indian-villages/

Monday, September 22, 2014

Friday, September 19, 2014

Canada: Aboriginal women part of ‘Canadian crisis’ human trafficking report says | Toronto Star

Canada: Aboriginal women part of ‘Canadian crisis’ human trafficking report says | Toronto Star:

OTTAWA—Aboriginal women and girls are easy prey for human traffickers because they are more likely to suffer from poverty, drug addictions and mental-health problems, says a newly disclosed report.
The Public Safety Canada study sheds new light on how women and girls are forced into the sex trade by pimps acting as boyfriends, small, loosely defined gangs and even members of their own families.