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Thursday, December 18, 2014

UK Parliament hears of slavery risks in NC tobacco fields

The British House of Commons debated legislation today addressing human rights abuses in UK-based companies' supply chains, and North Carolina's tobacco fields came up as as an example of a workplace where modern-day slavery is a real risk.
Member of Parliament Ian Lavery spoke about the conditions he and fellow Labor Party MP James Sheridan witnessed during a July fact-finding mission to eastern North Carolina tobacco farms, which supply the British cigarette industry. Joined by U.S. Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio), who wrote about the experience for The Nation, they were hosted by the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, an Ohio-based union that represents migrant workers in North Carolina and the Midwest.
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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Few charged with human trafficking end up behind bars | Canada | News | Calgary

LONDON, Ont. - Arrests in recent years for human trafficking have made for exciting front page headlines. The withdrawal of charges have happened without notice.

The low success rate in human trafficking charges is raising questions about the way those laws are being applied.

"It is really tricky. There are a lot of grey areas," said Karlee Anne Sapoznik, head of the Alliance Against Modern Slavery, a Canadian non-profit advocacy group. "If you look at the difference between Canada and the United States, it's quite shocking the success rates for convictions for trafficking."

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Ending human trafficking a 'fight we must continue', state leaders say | Lubbock Online | Lubbock Avalanche-Journal

AUSTIN – In recent sessions, the Texas Legislature has passed laws aimed at making it tough for human traffickers and pimps, as well as helping the victims of those criminals.
It looks like the upcoming session will be no different.
As in the case of legislation aimed at reducing the number of child deaths due to abuse or neglect, anti-human trafficking proposals are also expected to get the lawmakers’ attention when the Legislature is back in session on Jan. 13.
“This is a fight that we must continue,” said Rep. John Frullo who, in his four years as a legislator, has successfully authored legislation aimed at giving law enforcement the resources they need to combat this problem.
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Ending human trafficking a 'fight we must continue', state leaders say | Lubbock Online | Lubbock Avalanche-Journal:


Monday, December 15, 2014

BBC News - Churches key to combating slavery across the world


Nadia was married at 13, and trafficked across the Indian border to a life of domestic servitude by her own husband.
Now in her 60s, she has finally found refuge in the UK, in a small but cosy bedroom in a safe house, thanks to the Salvation Army and the Hestia human trafficking project.
But for many years, she was a victim of modern slavery, locked up in a house in a country in South East Asia that was not her own, with identity documents falsified by her husband to claim that she was from elsewhere. Nadia cries as she remembers it.

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Saturday, December 6, 2014

Modern slavery under the lens | Denton Record Chronicle | News for Denton County, Texas

Researchers at the University of Texas School of Social Work in Austin will be charting the scope of human trafficking in the state as part of the Texas Slavery Mapping Project.
The two-year initiative is funded by a $500,000 state grant awarded to the Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault and the Bureau of Business Research at UT.
Both organizations are working with Allies Against Slavery, a nonprofit organization, to document the extent of human trafficking across the state.
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